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Monday, February 7, 2011

Garrett GT20 - GT2052 - 52 TRIM - 225 HP


This is the second biggest (power wise) GT20 Garrett turbocharger, it's a 225 HP turbo and the recommended engine size for this turbo is 1400cc to 2000cc. It works well if you're looking for 140 HP also. 


There are many different verions of the Garrett GT20 turbo. There are two different model numbers that I am going to show here with the only difference is that the turbos have different mounting angles. But everything else is the same.


Model: 727264-1 and 2
CHRA: 451298-43

Bearing: Journal 
Cooling: Oil
Compressor
Inducer: 37.6 mm
Exducer: 52.2 mm
Trim: 52
A/R 0.51

Turbine
Wheel: 47.0 mm
Trim: 72
A/R: 0.50
Wastegated



The oil inlet thread is M10x1.0 and the oil outlet threads are M6x1.0. This turbo is not watercooled.



Service Kit
Component
Quantity
Item
Journal bearing
1
1

Retaining ring, jnl/brg
1
2
Pin, anti-rotation, jnl/brg
1
3
Piston ring, t/end
1
4
Thrust bearing
1
5
Bolt, seal plate/th brg
4
6
Thrust spacer
1
7
Piston ring, c/end
1
8
O ring, seal plate/brg hsg
1
9
Thrust collar
1
10
Locknut/shaft111
O ring, c/hsg112
Bolt, c/end613
Bolt, t/end 4 16



I also have more technical pages for you that will come in handy. They will be of great help when looking at compressor maps Use the conversion tools And you will be able to calculate airflow, pressure and HP figures for the turbocharger you are interested in.

159 comments:

Anonymous said...

hi mate just wondering if this is the turbo for the zd30 navara?

JD said...

Hello there, I can only find that the Nissan zd30 Navara use an HT12-19D Hitachi turbocharger that is a bit bigger than the Garrett GT2052 turbocharger.
The inducer Diameter is bigger than the Garrett GT20 with 40.94 mm.
And the Exducer Diameter is 53.72 mm. The Hitachi is also an 58 trim turbo.

The other things that differ from the Garrett GT20 turbocharger is that the Hitachi HT12 turbo use a 3 bolt flange on both the compressor and exhaust housing. So if you still want to use an GT20 turbocharger you would need to make an adapter plate to make the thing fit to the exhaust manifold.

Anonymous said...

Would this fit a 02 a4 2.5 tdi ? I'm looking for an upgrade from the standard turbo

JD said...

Hello,

It all depends on what turbocharger your Audi is fitted with already. If your 2.5 tdi engine is fitted with the Garrett GTB2260VK turbocharger then it is a larger turbo than the Garrett GT2052 turbo.

The GTB2260VK turbo have a 44.5mm inducer and support around 310 hp if you can get 35 psi (2.5 bar) boost pressure. However even the smaller (36mm inducer) GTB17 turbochargers found support 200 hp. So even if you have one of the smaller turbos fitted to your Audi Turbo Diesel, the GT2052 turbocharger would not be much of an upgrade for you.

Can't give much advice not knowing what turbocharger you already have but for an upgrade you really should need to look at the Garrett GT25 or GT28 turbochargers also, however these won't fit without changes made to your exhaust downpipe etc.

There is also a Garrett GTB2566VK Billet Hybrid Turbocharger made that use a 50mm compressor wheel and compressor cover that support 340 hp, this is also a good option for an upgrade with minimal modifications to the engine.

Anonymous said...

hi,
I have a 1999 2.9d 5 cyl 310D sprinter motorhome conversion. reg no T32 LTV
the numbers on the alloy tag on the garret turbo are;
GT20
A6020960899
454207-1AL
I am struggling to get a recon turbo can you tell me what I have and what I need /will fit?
someone said my engine was the 122bhp model but im not sure,
many thanks, Brent
my e mail is brenttuffs@yahoo.co.uk

JD said...

Hello Brent, it looks like you have a Garrett GT20C turbocharger from the number (A6020960899) you gave me. These turbos can be found in Sprinters all the way back to 1995 up to 2006. I think the main thing that can be different is the exhaust housing so make sure the exhaust housings match with the replacement turbocharger.

Brand-new Garrett GT20S (A6020960899) turbocharger for sale for £480.55 (link below)

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/GT25C-Garrett-Mecedes-Benz-Sprinter-2-9-TD-75kw-102Ps-85kw-115Ps-90kw-122Ps-NEU-/161750433334?hash=item25a913be36

Exhange GT20C turbocharger half the price for £220.00 (link below)

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Mercedes-Sprinter-2-9-LD-turbocharger-Garrett-454184-454207-A6020960899-/221502657998?hash=item33929655ce

This should fit your motorhome if the numbers provided are correct with the engine Mecedes Benz Sprinter 2,9 TD 75kw 102Ps 85kw 115Ps 90kw 122Ps

OEM MB numbers: A6020960199, A6020960699 A6020960899, 6020901380, 6020960199, 6020960699 6020960899, 602096089980

Garrett numbers: 454111-0001, 4541110001 454184-0001 4541840001, 454207-0001, 4542070001 454207-5001S, 4542075001S

Mercedes Benz
Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 2-T Bus 901, 902 210 D 1997/03-2000/04 2874 ccm, 75 KW, 102 PS
Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 2-T Bus 901, 902 212 D 1995/02-2000/04 2874 ccm, 90 KW, 122 PS
Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 2-T Kasten 901, 902 210 D 1997/01-2000/04 2874 ccm, 75 KW, 102 PS
Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 2-T Kasten 901, 902 212 D 1995/02-2000/04 2874 ccm, 90 KW, 122 PS
Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 2-T Pritsche/Fahrgestell 901, 902 210 D 1997/01-2000/04 2874 ccm, 75 KW, 102 PS
Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 2-T Pritsche/Fahrgestell 901, 902 212 D 1995/02-2000/04 2874 ccm, 90 KW, 122 PS
Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 3-T Bus 903 310 D 4x4 1997/05-2002/08 2874 ccm, 75 KW, 102 PS
Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 3-T Bus 903 312 D 2.9 1995/02-2000/04 2874 ccm, 90 KW, 122 PS
Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 3-T Bus 903 312 D 2.9 4x4 1997/05-2002/08 2874 ccm, 90 KW, 122 PS
Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 3-T Kasten 903 310 D 2.9 1995/02-2000/04 2874 ccm, 75 KW, 102 PS
Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 3-T Kasten 903 312 D 2.9 1995/02-2000/04 2874 ccm, 90 KW, 122 PS
Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 3-T Kasten 903 312 D 2.9 4x4 1997/05-2002/08 2874 ccm, 90 KW, 122 PS
Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 3-T Pritsche/Fahrgestell 903 310 D 2.9 1997/01-2000/04 2874 ccm, 75 KW, 102 PS

Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 3-T Pritsche/Fahrgestell 903 312 D 2.9 1995/02-2000/04 2874 ccm, 90 KW, 122 PS
Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 4-T Kasten 904 410 D 1996/02-2006/05 2874 ccm, 75 KW, 102 PS
Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 4-T Kasten 904 410 D 4x4 1997/05-2006/05 2874 ccm, 75 KW, 102 PS
Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 4-T Kasten 904 412 D 1996/02-2006/05 2874 ccm, 85 KW, 115 PS
Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 4-T Kasten 904 412 D 1996/02-2006/05 2874 ccm, 90 KW, 122 PS
Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 4-T Kasten 904 412 D 4x4 1997/05-2006/05 2874 ccm, 85 KW, 115 PS
Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 4-T Kasten 904 412 D 4x4 1997/05-2006/05 2874 ccm, 90 KW, 122 PS
Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 4-T Pritsche/Fahrgestell 904 410 D 1996/02-2006/05 2874 ccm, 75 KW, 102 PS
Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 4-T Pritsche/Fahrgestell 904 410 D 4x4 1997/05-2006/05 2874 ccm, 75 KW, 102 PS
Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 4-T Pritsche/Fahrgestell 904 412 D 1996/02-2006/05 2874 ccm, 85 KW, 115 PS
Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 4-T Pritsche/Fahrgestell 904 412 D 1996/02-2006/05 2874 ccm, 90 KW, 122 PS
Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 4-T Pritsche/Fahrgestell 904 412 D 4x4 1997/05-2006/05 2874 ccm, 85 KW, 115 PS
Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 4-T Pritsche/Fahrgestell 904 412 D 4x4 1997/05-2006/05 2874 ccm, 90 KW, 122 PS

Hope this helps you out!

VR6 said...

Will this work for a MK5 GTi?

JD said...

Hi, the Golf MK5 GTi turbochargers have the turbocharger turbine housings and exhaust manifolds cast as one piece. So any aftermarket turbocharger won't be a direct fit for the Golf GTi engine. You would need at the least an aftermarket exhaust manifold made to fit the new turbo along with the first section of the exhaust pipe (because it looks like the GTi turbo have it's own different flange for the turbine outlet too).

TREX700 said...

Amigo tengo una camioneta China Chery h5 con turbo garrett modelo GT20 (484b-1118010ba) motor 2.0 4cilindros 16v. Para optimizarlo que turbo le podría montar? Para que tenga fuerza o velocidad gracias.

JD said...

Hi Jhonny, like with most China turbochargers they don't show you any compressor maps. And when you can't get the flow rate and pressure rates for a turbocharger that makes it very hard to figure out how it will perform on a engine.

Unknown said...

Hi
Currently running a GT2052LS on my MG. Was wondering if the GT2052V would be much on an upgrade if its variable vane would help increase boost? It is a 1.8 petrol. I would like to keep the same flanges as ive just had an exhaust made for it

Any advice you could offer on gt2052ls upgrades would be much appreciated

JD said...

Hi Luke, you wont seen an increase in boost with only switching from the GT2052LS to the variable vane GT2052V turbocharger. What you can expect from the varible vane turbocharger is that it comes on boost a bit sooner, so you will have a wider powerband with the variable vane turbo.

It looks like the GT2052SL turbocharger have a 38.3mm compressor wheel, and that means it will flow a bit more air than the common GT2052 shown here that have a 37.6mm inducer. But I don't think you would see much gains in running over 1.6bar of boost and it will probably give you 245 hp at best. Anything over 1.5bar on the compressor map for the smaller 37.6mm inducer turbo won't give any gains in airflow and that's maxed out at 225 hp.

Now the next step up is the 41.5mm inducer GT2056 turbocharger, and it will allow you to run over 2bar boost and give around 260 hp if your engine can support it. However the turbine outlet on the bigger GT2056 is of a 4 bolt style so your exhaust wont fit.

http://turbochargerspecs.blogspot.com/2011/02/garrett-gt20-gt2056-55-trim-260-hp.html

Perhaps you can find someone that can make you a hybrid turbocharger with the 41.5mm compressor and wheel from the GT2056 turbocharger and using the variable vane GT2052V. That would be the best of two worlds and you could keep all your current exhaust parts.


Anonymous said...

HI
I have Renault laguna II 1.9dci f9q engine.
I have this turbo
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/RENAULT-LAGUNA-1-9-DCI-2005-TURBO-CHARGER-M53-GT1749V-8200369581-CHEAP-/361567855234?hash=item542f1fa282:g:zy8AAOSwDV1XQveq
I was wondering to upgrade to this:
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/New-Nissan-Terrano-Mistral-Patrol-ZD30ETI-GT2052V-3-0-Turbo-charger-/291773276735?hash=item43ef0ae23f:g:EhYAAOSwUfNXRcys
or to this:
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Turbo-for-Nissan-Pathfinder-Navara-D40-14411-EB300-751243-2-5L-YD25DDTi-GT2056V-/201460068791?hash=item2ee7f4b1b7:g:HXYAAOSwstxVekcm
What is better solution for upgrade? Because i want more air. currently i have 1.4bar boost and it is maximum what it can take i think.
Can you tell me more about my turbo because i cant find right compresor map for it because it is ar0.42 and i only find 0.46 map on the internet.

JD said...

Hi
The GT1752 Garrett Turbochargers came stock with the Saab 9-3 and 9-5s, it's not a big turbo (38.6mm inducer) but the GT1752 have been known to make around 240hp on 2 liter Saab engines.

I would not recommend the GT2052 turbocharger for you it actually have a smaller 37.6mm inducer so it won't give you more airflow and it also maxes out around 1.4-1.5 bar boost.

The Garrett GT2056 turbocharger however have a bigger 41.5 mm inducer and flow much more air and supports 260hp but if you have a good engine and intercooler and can push it to 2 bar boost then close to 300hp from the GT2056 turbocharger is possible.

Unknown said...

Hi!
I have a renault trafic 1.9 dci with GT1549S running 1.2 bar pressure. I want to go s litle further, so, how much can this tutbo handle? 1.4, 1.5bar?
Thanks!

JD said...

Hello, you can run the GT15 turbocharger to around 1.4 bar boost. You won't see much gain over that and 1.5 bar boost is max.

http://turbochargerspecs.blogspot.com/2011/02/garrett-gt15-gt1548-200-hp.html

Looking at the compressor map in the link we can see that around 1.3-1.4 bar boost gives the most airflow / HP and is best for the Garrett GT15 turbocharger.

Unknown said...

Hey got a uno turbo 1.4 what propper size turbo can I put on for real performance(pvdm42@gmail.com)

Unknown said...

I can get a gt2052 what kw will I put out on the wheels??????

Unknown said...

I can get a gt2052 what kw will I put out on the wheels??????

Unknown said...

Hey got a uno turbo 1.4 what propper size turbo can I put on for real performance(pvdm42@gmail.com)

JD said...

Hello Petrus, you would probably see around 130kw at the wheels with the Garrett GT2052 turbocharger with around 1.3bar boost.

Unknown said...

Hello, I have a gt20s on a mercedes om611.960 cdi engine. Its making 1.35bar, should i replace it with a gt25s if i switch injectors, because this are maxed out?

Unknown said...

I mean gt2052s (wastegate turbo)

Unknown said...

Hello buddy
I have peugeot 406 D9
Petrol valve 4 / 16 1.998 cc 132 PS (97 kW; 130 hp) / 5.500 180 N·m (130 lb·ft) / 4.200

Which one turbo garrett good one i choose man thanks before

Unknown said...

I have this turbo fitted to my 2009 alfa romeo 147 1.9 ltd 16v q2.

How much more can I go with this turbo?

It's peak is 1.55 bar and starting to spool from 2100 rpm and peak comes at 3000. Power we get was 206 hp before I installed cai kit and hg motorsports 8 liters intercooler as we calculated by racebox Dbn. It must be around 210 hp we guess. What's the limit I can push for more power?

JD said...

Hi Veysel, it looks to me it's your engine is what's limiting power for you now. At 1.55bar boost the GT2052 turbo can flow around 200hp and a good intercooler gives a little more power like you say. However at around 1bar the GT2052 is more efficient and can flow around 225-230hp. I would recommend you port the cylinder head or fit bigger cams if that's the case, this would allow the GT2052 to work more efficiently and give you more power. Or because the GT2052 turbocharger already is at it's limit you could always fit a bigger turbo that's more efficient at 1.5bar for even more power. That way you would not have to port or fit better cams to the engine to get more power.

Unknown said...

Hi, is there t3 flange turbine housing that fits gt2052v? I have b19et volvo engine that has original to3 garrett, and I want something that wakes up earlier, looking for 180-200 hp. I want to keep the engine bay looking clean, (not neccesary stock) so the gt2052v would be perfect cause it has big volvo text casted on compressor housing.
Br. Elias Aarni

JD said...

Hi Elias, considering the old Garrett T3 Turbochargers flow 300-330hp and the bigger T34 turbos around 370hp, the turbine housing from those would not be the best if you are looking for 180-200hp with good spool. Instead I would recommend you find a Garrett GT15 or GT20 turbo, and then fit a T25 to T3 adapter flange on your manifold. That would give you the best spool and power.

T25 to T3 TURBO TURBINE EXHAUST MANIFOLD CONVERTER FLANGE ADAPTOR STEEL
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/T25-T3-TURBO-TURBINE-EXHAUST-MANIFOLD-CONVERTER-FLANGE-ADAPTOR-STEEL-/151925200068?hash=item235f7294c4

You can find these types of T25 to T3 adaptors in cast or stainless steel. But if you want to match your cast mainfold and turbo you could use the cast adaptor shown in the link.

Unknown said...

Hello there
I have a Nissan GU patio with an RD28t engine fitted. I'm looking to increase hp from standard 115 to 150/200 mainly for towing and better hill speed maintainability. I'm a bit confused as to what size turbomi should be looking at. I was thinking the gt2052 ?

JD said...

Hi Anthony, I think the GT2052 turbocharger would be too small for your RD28 engine to get 150 hp from that turbo. The Nissan RD28t engines have a very high compression ratio around 21:1 and need more air. That means the bigger Garrett GT2560 turbo is probably going to give you closer to 150hp and be good for towing.

Above 150hp and you should be looking at the GT2860RS turbo but going that big you are also losing low end power, and that would not be good for towing.

However there is also a better solution if you do compound turbocharging, where you keep your current turbocharger in place and mount a second bigger turbo like a GT28 that boosts the overall performance.

The reason I think you need to go much bigger is a normal car engine with 8:1 compression and the GT2560r is going to give around to 330hp. But scale that up to say 16:1 compression (twice the air is needed) and the same GT2560 turbo theoretically is only going to be able to supply air for 165hp.

It's not really that simple and many different factors come into play, but it's a quick way to figure out the size of the turbo needed. Some engines are more efficient and do well with smaller turbos.

Unknown said...

Hey guys iv got a 2003 nissan patrol gt2052v and looking at putting in a gtx-11 wheel, what size exhaust wheel would suit this compressor wheel of gtx-11. Alot of machining of the housing will be needed but just wondering what wheel would compliment. Im looking for 30psi and above. Or is there a simplier way? Have a modified head and everything else is done besides turbo. Dont particurly want to go away from variable vane if possible

JD said...

Hi, The general rule of thumb is you would want roughly the same size inducer as the turbine wheel size. But this depends on how much the compressor wheel is able to flow vs how much the turbine wheel is able to flow.

Simply you need to be able to get the same air you put in out, and if you can't do that you end up with high backpressure and unable to run the boost you want. Or in worst case you get compressor surge.

Most times the compressor wheel is able to flow more air than the same size turbine wheel so that's why you normally see on Garrett turbochargers that the exhaust is a bit bigger.

Looking at the Garrett GTX3071R turbo the numbers look like this
* Compressor Wheel Inducer: 54.1mm
* Compressor Wheel Exducer: 71.4mm
* Turbine Wheel Inducer: 60.0mm
* Turbine Wheel Exducer: 55.0mm

And the bigger Garrett GTX3076R turbocharger
Compressor Wheel Inducer: 58mm
Compressor Wheel Exducer: 76mm
Turbine Wheel Inducer: 60mm
Turbine Wheel Exducer: 55mm

Looking at this it's good to have a few mm bigger turbine to be on the safe side. But it's not set in stone.

Unknown said...

I have a gt2025v off of a 2.8l jeep crd and I was wondering about installing it on my air cooled VW 1600cc engine. The engine makes 40hp to the wheels, I am in colorado at 5000ft altitude I was told to look into a gt15 or gt1752 instead. also been told the vfn does not work well on gas engines? can you clear any of this up for me. I know I am limited to 6-6.5lbs boost due to compression and valve springs. this engine has max rpm of 5500. any help tips or advice? looking for about 100hp at the wheels.

Unknown said...

The turbo is a gt2056v not gt2052v.

JD said...

Hello Jeffery, well if you are limited to around 6 psi boost and also at a this high altitude, then the Garrett GT1548 turbocharger is much better if you are looking for 100hp.

I'm sure the GT2056v could work, and give you 100hp at the same boost levels, however it's still a much bigger turbo and if you are only going to rev to 5500rpm then the powerband will be much smaller with the GT20 vs the GT15 turbo.

However both the GT1548 and GT2056 turbochargers share the same T25 flanges, only the exhaust flange is a bit different so I guess you could try both turbochargers with some minor modifications to the exhaust if you feel like it.

If you have a Diesel Variable-geometry turbocharger then it can work on gas engines, and spool faster, but heat is a big problem. Diesels run cooler and exhaust temperatures are much lower than on gas engines and this is what kills the variable turbochargers.

But in the end it comes down to how hard you drive the turbocharger and how much time you are on boost, if you make a mental note that you need to give the turbo some time to cool down between "full boost" runs then they might last much longer.

Unknown said...


Does anyone know what difference there is between the gt2052r and the gt2052s?

JD said...

Hi fabrizio, I think the GT2052s turbocharger have a different turbine housing with a 3 bolt turbine inlet instead of the more common 4 bolt flange type that the GT2052R have. The GT2052s turbos are more engine specific and are found on SAAB 9-3 that also use it's own compressor cover with a built in blow off valve. They are also used on Land Rover, Opel, Nissan, Hyundai engines etc..

Unknown said...

I can't find any cams for my car. By porting did you mean port&polish processes?

You mean that at 1 bar turbo gives more power? So I should decrease that? I was thinking to go higher as 1.7 or 1.8

For more power, should I go for gtb 2060v? Do you recommend it?
Some people used it and got 300++ hp. But my turboback exhaust system is only 2.5", can it lift that?

JD said...

Hello Veysel, yes if you do a port & polish you could get 230hp with the GT2052 turbocharger with around 1 bar boost. If you go higher boost like 1.7 bar with the GT2052 then you go outside the compressor map for this turbo, and then it probably won't flow more air because the turbo lose efficiency and that is not optimal.

The Garrett GT2056 turbocharger or a GTB2060v turbo
http://turbochargerspecs.blogspot.com/2011/02/garrett-gt20-gt2056-55-trim-260-hp.html
would be a much better turbo for your engine because these turbochargers can flow much more air at high boost. The GT2056 at 1.5 bar up to 2 bar boost can flow 300hp. So if you go with some of these turbochargers like the GT2056 you would not need cams or a port or polish to get to 300hp.

The 2.5" exhaust should work fine if it's not restricted with a catalytic converter very close to the turbo etc.

A 3" exhaust will give you more flow and a little bit more power and it also can help spool the turbo a little bit faster. But for 300hp you should be fine with your 2.5" exhaust.

Unknown said...

Hi, just on the ZD30 Navara, could you recommend a Turbo that would be an upgrade from the factory Hitachi HT12-19D? ImI looking to make more power/torque through the rev range without losing too much low end response. Cheers :)

JD said...

Hi, well first off if you haven't done it already is to fit a front mount intercooler kit, it's really worth the money and gives you more power through the whole rev range without losing any response. If you live in a hot climate, also fitting a slimline fan on the intercooler is going to help keep the charge temps down and the power up.

I hear the stock pistons on the ZD30 engines seems to be the weak parts and don't like too much power. So I would be careful if going with a bigger turbo. But if you still want more power I would look at something in the range of the Garrett GT2256V Diesel (Variable Vane turbo) or GT2259 (Non variable vane type).

A good ECU Chip tune and exhaust system is also going to give you more power and torque without losing any low end.

Unknown said...

g'day,
do you know if a carbon seal can be fitted to the gt17 turbo?
thanks

JD said...

Hello Paddy, the GT turbos don't come with carbon oil seals, so if you can't find anyone that sells these you would need to use one from another turbo. It would be a very extensive mod to do. The only way to fit one would be to either machine the T3 or T2 carbon seal to fit the GT17 backplate or make a new custom backplate with a T3 or T2 carbon seal. And because the shaft sizes are bigger on the T3 turbochargers making the carbon seal too big, you would also need to find a creative way to either machine a new shaft or fit a T3 turbine wheel and shaft into your GT17 turbo.

It can be done but it won't be easy.

There are people that run draw thru setups without a carbon seal fitted, if it's a ball bearing turbo you can get away with running an oil line restrictor and having a very good oil drain so the oil have less chance of getting sucked out.

Unknown said...

thanks for the reply, pretty much what i was expecting.
what would be a turbo similar to the gt17 size that does/can have a carbon seal fitted? i have a ht18s-2s off an 88 rx7 that does have a carbon seal but its way big for an old 1.2l, even with one scroll blocked off i still think itd spool too late to be much good.

JD said...

Hello Paddy, you would need to find the old generation Garrett T2 turbos from early to late 90s Lancia or Citroen that have these part numbers TB2572, TB2529, TB2531, TB2567, TB2552, TB2510, TB2509.

These Garrett TB turbochargers come with a 38.2mm compressor inducers so they are the closest match to a GT17 turbo.

However the old Garrett T2 turbochargers also came with smaller 35.7mm inducers so you want to make sure what type T2 turbo you get because the GT17 turbos have 38.62 mm inducers.

And to add some more confusion the old generation T25 turbos might be easier to find and they also came with the 38.2mm compressors but on some cars they had even bigger compressors with 42.5 mm inducers. So that would be a bit bigger still compared to your HT18-2 turbo that should have a 41.7 mm inducer.

But as long as you search for a turbo with the part numbers I listed above you should have a Garrett T2 turbo very similar to the GT17.


Unknown said...

thanks for that.

FYI the ht18s-2s has a 44/63 comp and 64/54 turbine.
I used one on an old datsun L18 about 20 years ago and it did ok.

Unknown said...

Hey Jens! I have a mercedes c200 cdi from 1999, it has a gt20s turbocharger, i've already done a stage 1 upgrade with air filter, free-flowing exhaust system and a remap. I'm looking to push it further but don't know what turbo should i get for getting ~200bhp (it has 102hp stock, ~140 after mods). This will be accompanied by larger injectors but I need a turbo that doesn't require much physical work to match the om611 engine :) Thanks

JD said...

Hello, I read that newer European MB cars from 2010 have more hp than what is officially claimed by MB, closer to 200hp on some engines when put on a dyno. So if I where you I would look at a turbocharger from one of the newer models like 220 CDI and 320CDI. Otherwise the Garrett GT2252 or the GT2259 should give you a solid 200hp.

Unknown said...

I have a Astra 1.7 CDTi 100 and currently have the GTB1546V (779591). What's the max boost pressure and max HP achievable on this?

JD said...

Hello Rambo, by not having the compressor map for the GTB1546V I can only estimate from looking at other Garrett GT15 turbochargers. But I would say somewhere around 1.5-1.6 bar boost (22psi) is where the max boost would be. Above this the turbocharger will start to heat up the compressed air too much for it to be efficient and make more power. At these boost levels you would be looking at around 150hp+.

However to keep the turbocharger reliable most people stick to around 1.3-1.4 bar boost and that would make around 130hp. And this seems to be what a good remap will give on these Opel Astra 1.7 CDTi engines.


Unknown said...

Hi,JD i got a gt20 a605096049s it is stock om my mercedes om605 engine.
My pump is now fitted with 7mm element and the workshop that reworked it says it i good for some 350-400 hp.
But it needs more air..
with stock turbo it feels like max200hp from 3000rm and up ,and pressure is some 1.2 -1.4bar.
Workshop say i need 2.5 bar to get the 300hp....
Is there any turbos that fit my stock exaust .
Guide me please.
Mats

JD said...

Hello Mats, unfortunately if you have the stock om605 manifold you also have the 3 bolt flange GT20 turbo. If you are looking for around 300hp then you want to get a turbocharger that have either a T25 or T3 flange but these won't be a direct fit to the manifold.

However you can make an adapter similar to this like seen in this picture
https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-lWR_vMoIVfI/Wz5c2m1vouI/AAAAAAAAETM/2WkI-YgpZQsOs1pskIRqHdu5jJhk3E_KgCLcBGAs/s1600/om605%2Bturbo%2Bflange%2Badapter%2B1%2Bwww.TurbochargerSpecs.blogspot.com.jpg

Here you can see a Holset HX turbo fitted to the manifold with a similar adapter

https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-2KMgDQTHoYY/Wz5c2kKQeHI/AAAAAAAAETQ/01h0Qf9BIgcHDONumlbUoP_eCrGD0oZTwCLcBGAs/s1600/om605%2Bturbo%2Bflange%2Badapter%2B2%2Bwww.TurbochargerSpecs.blogspot.com.jpg

So basically if you want to keep the stock manifold you can make it work with an added adapter. In your case a Holset HX35 (T3 flange) or similar size turbo would be able to provide the 2.5 bar boost and around 300-350hp. You should have full boost around 2-2500rpm with that setup.

Good thing with the Diesel Holset HX turbos are there are upgrade options where you only need to replace the compressor wheel and cover to reach 400hp with the HX35 if you want to push it that far. However I would fit a 7.5mm element in the pump the make sure there is enough fuel then.

Unknown said...

Hello, i have the 2.0T kia stinger that says it has gt20 turbo on it from factory. What would be the next size up if i wanted to run 100+hp on stock motor still? Thank you

JD said...

Hello, there's not much information out yet about the Kia Stinger 2.0 turbos so I can only guess at the moment and go with the little info there is. They do seem to use Garrett turbos but they are also specifically made for Kia. Considering the 2.0L I-4 engine output is 255hp then the closest GT20 Garrett turbo would be the GT2056 turbocharger. However this would only be the case if the turbos are journal bearing, at this moment I don't know if they are journal bearing or ball bearing turbos. If however the turbo is a ball bearing turbo then it could be something similar to the GT2554R turbo. But in either case I guess it is probably a hybrid turbo with either a different compressor or turbine from the GT2056, or a hybrid GT2554R turbo.

I can't find any info on what stock boost pressures are but I assume Kia would run around 10 psi or 0.7bar boost on these engines to make the 255hp. If this is the case and Kia use a compressor wheel similar to the GT2056 turbocharger then there is a good chance that the engine can run close to 300hp if the boost pressure is increased to 15-17 psi or around 1.2 bar boost with the stock turbo, if it is similar in performance to the GT2056 turbo that is. Then again if the turbo is more like the GT2554R, then the turbo would be maxed out around 270hp with the same boost pressures.

A good upgrade turbocharger would be the GT2560R turbo, with a good setup at around 17-18 psi or 1.3 bar boost you would see around 330hp with that turbocharger.

Unknown said...

Ok. Thank you. I shoild be able to digure it out with what your saying and what i already know. Thank you. You are a big help

Unknown said...

Hello, I have Land Rover discovery 2 TD5 with Garrett GT2052s, can I change it with GT2052V without any modification? or wich modification I need?

it's off-road car and I need to increase airflow on low rpm.

JD said...

Hello, I think the flanges on the Garrett GT2052s and GT2052V exhaust housings are different so you would at least need to get some adapter flanges made.

Unknown said...

Hi JD,I have a td5 defender (2001)which has the stock GT20turbo,I have ported the head,exhaust manifold,inlet manifold to a smooth but not polished finish.I intend to fit a larger aftermarket intercooler,re-program ECU map.
I would be happy with 1.2bar boost pressure Im living in Gauteng which is somewhere in the 3000ft altitude area. Would appreciate your advice.I can make my own adaptors if needed,many thanks in advance.

JD said...

Hello, I would try looking for a Garrett GT2259 turbocharger. Living at that altitude means the turbocharger needs to be working harder to maintain the 1.2 bar boost, so the "real" work put in by the turbo is more like if you would be running 1.4 bar boost at sea level.

Basically at sea level the GT2259 turbo would be spinning 120,000 rpm to maintain 1.2bar boost, but as you go up in altitude the turbo rpm increase to around 140,000 rpm. Still in the safe zone and would give you a long turbo life.

Another turbo that would give similar performance would be the ball bearing GT2554R turbo, however at the same boost pressures that turbo would be pushing around 160,000 rpm. While the a bit smaller journal bearing GT2259 turbo would be running around 170,000 rpm.


Unknown said...

Hi JD, I have a 2003 Saab 9-3 2.0t Arc which has a Garrett GT2052s Turbo, the engine is a B207L 4-inline turbo. Oil seals on turbo just blew out, would you recommend refitting it with a new center housing rotating assembly or replacing it? if the latter are there any other direct bolt on turbos you are aware of that I can use to squeeze out a little more power from this engine.

Thanks
Jay

JD said...

Hello Jay, the issue is the 3 bolt flange the GT2052s turbochargers use. It's not a common flange and any upgrade turbo would have the more common T25 style flange, so not a direct swap.

Considering the price for a new "Not Garret but a clone" replacement aftermarket GT2052-S turbo is around 400 dollars, and you have the center housings going around half that price around 200 dollars.

However for less than 100 dollars you can get the rebuild kit with all the seals and bearings.. It is recommended that you after changing the seals and bearings to send the turbo for a balancing, so that will add some cost. So it's really up to you how much work you want to do.

If I had the car and not a lot of extra time I would get the replacement center housing and swap that out for a quick fix.

Tim said...

Hi does the GT2052LS and GT2052V have the same manifold flange ?

Tim said...

What is the lowest (wastegate pressure) boost GT2052LS can make ?

JD said...

Hello Tim, the flange types on the GT2052 turbochargers depends on what car it was meant to be on, the GT2052LS turbo made for Land Rover have both 4 and 3 bolt. But also Hyundai have one with a 3 bolt. Volkswagen also use their own 3 bolt flange type on the same turbo, but I don't think it is the same 3 bolt style flange as the rest.

Lowest boost pressure is probably around 10 psi / 0,7 bar with the wastegate connected. If you disconnect the wastegate actuator linkage you could probably get that down to 0,1 bar boost.

Unknown said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Unknown said...

Hi! JD I am looking info and specs about GT20 turbo P/N 714334-5001

JD said...

Hello, the number P/N 714334-5001 is for the Garrett GT2359V probably from a Lancia Thesis 2.0 20V 2001 M.648.19 185 HP.

Part / OEM numbers for this turbo include:
714334-5001S 714334-0002 714334-0001 714334-5002S
714334 5001S 714334 0002 714334 0001 714334 5002S
7143345001S 7143340002 7143340001 7143345002S

467916880 71723498 714334 7143341 6500092 47.092
714334-1 714334-2 714334-3 714334-4 714334-5
714334-6 714334-7 714334-8 714334-9 714334


The Garrett GT2359v is also found on MB OM613, OM648 engines.

Model: GT2359V
CHRA: 714334-5001S
Bearing: Journal
Cooling: Oil

Compressor wheel
Inducer: 44.4mm
Exducer: 59.4mm
12 blades
55 trim
A/R: 0.51

Turbine wheel
Inducer: 51.2mm
Exducer: 47mm
9 blades
Wastegated

The compressor map is similar to the Garrett GT2056 turbocharger but the GT2359v is able to flow a bit more air due to the bigger compressor and turbine wheels. Around 200hp is normal for this turbo on a Diesel and around 300hp on a petrol engine.

Unknown said...

Thank you very much for the detailed info!

Unknown said...

 Hey. GT2052, would probably be the best option for a 900cc motorcycle? Dyno http://www.heikkil.net/nuda/nudadyno.jpg
I count on the spool up from 3000-3500rpm and 150-160HP at 8000-9000rpm with a maximum torque of 6000rpm. What are your thoughts on this?

JD said...

Hello, with the GT2052 turbo running 10 psi / 0,7 bar boost pressure you should see around 160 hp and with some more boost around 200 hp max. Using a very short turbo manifold like most bikes due to the limited space you can expect the turbo to spool around 3-4000 rpm.

However if you have an intercooler and the engine can support more boost pressure you could go with an even bigger turbocharger like the GT2554R also. It would make the turbo spool up a bit slower around 4-5000rpm but the power is easier to control and it helps keep the front wheel on the ground.

You would still make around 150 hp at the same boost levels but if you can run higher boost like 21 psi / 1.5 bar boost you could see around 250 hp with the bigger turbo.

Unknown said...

Plese help, i have 1.6 hdi 66kw before it shiped and straiht piped , can i put gt2052 turbo ?

Unknown said...

Chiped and straight piped*

JD said...

Hello, you could fit the GT2052 turbo and get an extra 50hp, however the exhaust flange and turbine housing is different on the GT2052. So the only way you can make it fit would be to make a custom made flange adapter, or a new manifold to fit the GT2052 turbo if there is enough space in the engine room.

Kevin said...

Hello, i have a suzuki TL1000R 1000cc v-twin and i want a turbocharger on it. im doubting between a GT2052 and a GT2554R. Can you help me which one is the better one or do you reccomend a other turbo? Thank you!!

JD said...

Hello Kevin, I would probably go with the GT2052 turbo because you would get a bit quicker spool vs the GT2554R turbo but still be able to get around 200hp. With the GT2554R turbo however you could get more power, around 250hp but if you are not going past 200hp then the smaller GT2052 turbo would be the better option. I would expect the turbo to kick in around 5-6000rpm with a good setup.

pilz971 said...

Hi JD. Great blog Brother, you must REALLY have the boost bug! So, I am transplanting a K16 turbo lump from an MG ZT into my nasp MG ZS. The engine has a GT2052 fitted and I want to fit a turbo blanket to do all I can to cut down on heat in the engine bay. My question is, what size blanket do I need? Plenty on the bay of evil for the GT25 and up but no mention of my poor GT20.
Keep up the great work. I WILL be back for advice on where to go next, larger turbo for more boost, when £££`s (the Missus really!) allows.

JD said...

Hello pilz971, I would say most turbo blankets are made as one size fits all. But if you get the T2, T25 or T3 turbo blankets they would fit the GT20 turbo. However I was thinking on fitting one myself but there is a concern also with turbo blankets that they are trapping in the heat around the turbo too much so it takes a long time for the turbo to cool down properly. And because of that there is a high risk of cooking the oil in the turbo with a turbo blanket fitted.

Now if you really need to keep the heat away but worried about damaging the turbo I would instead advice you to get a slight bigger blanket like for a T4 or GT30 turbo. Or you can try and make the springs for the blanket longer so the blanket won't fit so tight around the housing and let the heat out more. Also some heat wrap for the downpipe and manifold would keep the engine bay temps down.

pilz971 said...

Thanks JD, sound advice my friend.

Unknown said...

Hey there JD I have a zd30 and my turbo is on its way out any recommendations on what turbo I can use as a upgrade

JD said...

Hello, if your ZD30 engine already have a variable vane type turbocharger then I would go with the GT2252V turbo (found on 2.5 VW T4 Transporters). It should give you around 30hp more power. Or if you want a bit more top end power then the GT2260V turbo should be a good upgrade.

If the ZD30 is the petrol version then the non variable vane GT2260 turbo (found on BMW X5 3.0 D) would be good a upgrade.

Unknown said...

Thanks alot Jd I forgot to mention that I've got a remapped ecu along with a Tunit Chip install, so I'm guessing I should go with the GT2252V ?

JD said...

Hello, the GT2252V would be the best option for low end power over the GT2260V. However with a good tune the GT2260V could give you a bit more mid and top end power over the GT2252V, but that is only if the ecu can be remapped and the stock injectors and pump can flow that much more Diesel to support the extra airflow.

Unknown said...

Hey I have a 2002 patrol zd30 looking at getting away from the stock turbo as it gets too hot and puts the variable vain at risk could you recommend a turbo. I currently have a Garrett tbp430 from a 7L Nino truck not sure if this would be audible or cause more problems

JD said...

Hello, the TBP430 do support similar power figures but it is also an older design with a bigger compressor wheel around 53mm inducer. So it is going to be slower to spool up than the newer design GT series turbochargers.

If you want to have similar performance and spool up times as the stock patrol zd30 turbo setup then something like the Ball Bearing GT2554R turbo is a good option. If you are looking more into durability and ease of repair then the Journal Bearing GT2252 or GT2259 turbos would be a good option.

dave said...

Hi I have a ssangyong rexton which has the Garrett GT2056S turbo I believe! What's next stage up please

JD said...

Hello Dave, I would go with the Garrett GT2252 / GT2252S turbo. It would be a good upgrade, the spool up time would almost be the same and it should give you +50hp over the stock power and GT2056 turbo. If the stock pump and injectors are also up to the job that is.

Unknown said...

Hello there, i have Mitsubishi l200 2.5td with td04-11g i think, how much bigger is garret gt2052? is it suitable to be in 2.5 diesel? or should it be more like holset hx30?

JD said...

Hello, the GT2052 and TD04-11g have pretty much the same size. The TD04 might be a better choice if you need to run higher boost pressures above 1.5 bar / 22 psi but other than that they should perform the same. You could go with the HX30 also but it is a bigger turbo so if you don't need more power you should stay with the stock size as the Holset supports +50hp over the stock turbo.

Unknown said...

Hello, Recently got my hands on a Garrett GT2052S, Garrett Part Number 708257-5001S, OE Part Number 79050 from a MB Sprinter (2.1 Diesel I assume). I want to know if its the same as the one described here in this page and if it would work on a Toyota 21R engine doing of course all the exhaust fabrications. The engine its a 2.0 l I4

dave said...

Thanks for reply. What sort of intercooler (psi wise) for the GT2056S that be an improvement on stock one?

JD said...

Hello dave, I think the stock intercooler should be fine to use, but if you want to do an upgrade and go with an all aluminum one then something like the universal 450x140 or 550x140 intercoolers for sale would probably be a good upgrade. But remember that a bigger intercooler and if you need to use longer boost pipes will also takes longer to fill for the turbo, so it will add a little bit to turbo spool up time over a smaller size intercooler.

JD said...

Hello, the Sprinter 708257-5001S turbo is similar and do have the same size turbine wheel as the Garrett GT2052S turbo. However the turbine housings are different and use different flanges but otherwise should be similar. It would work fine with the 2.0L Toyota 21R engine if you do some fabrication.

Unknown said...

Hi JD , I have a MGZT with a Mitsubishi TDO25L3-OCT 33 ? turbo , would prefer to fit a Garrett as on my Rover 600 [ GT1549] OR preferably a GT2052LS off an MGZT 180 Petrol any comments ?, I am prepared to fabricate flange adapters and a new down pipe .
Kind regards Paul.

Unknown said...

Hi JD , Update for Mitsubishi turbo on Rover MGZT 2.0LTR BMW engine cdti diesel TD025L-08T/3.3 RATED AT 13-56 PS ENGINE OUTPUT !!! ,For engine displacement 0.7 - 1.5L
Kind regards Paul .

JD said...

Hello Paul, I'm not sure what size compressor is used on the Rover 600 GT1549 turbo. But if you can find a GT1549 turbo that use the 36mm or the bigger preferred 37mm compressor wheel then I would go with that GT15 turbo.

The GT1549 would have almost the same size compressor wheel as the GT2052LS turbo. But with the exception that the GT15 use a smaller 42mm turbine housing and wheel so it would spool quicker and still be able to give you almost the same power as the GT2052 turbo.

The GT2052 use a bigger 47mm turbine housing so it is going to give you a little bit more top end power but at the same time you would also have a bit less responsive engine. Also both the GT1549 and GT2052 turbos should have no problems running up to 1.5 bar / 22 psi boost pressure.

Unknown said...

Thamks for the reply JD i will investigate the GT1549 and be in touch if i need any more advise , kind regards Paul .

CT said...

Hi JD,

First let me congratulate you for keeping up this blog going almost 10 years, while demonstrating very good technical knowhow all these years. I hope you are doing well in the current lockdown.

A quick technical question: what is the difference between the GT2052 and the GT2252-S? From what I pick up in the web the GT2252-S seems to share the same compressor section (and compressor map) as the GT2052, while having the larger turbine section of the GT2252.

If that is the case, then a GT2252-S will seem suitable for the Saab 9-3 B207L engine application (2.0 liter 16V, 175HP stock @ about 0.6 bars boost) as that engine originally came with the GT2052 as the stock turbo. I understand of course there are numerous mounting and packaging issues, but I'd like to focus on the performance interchangeability of these two turbo units.

Grateful your feedback if the GT2252-S and GT2052 share the same compressor. Meaning I can use the GT2252-S conservatively, as a long-life unit replacement for the stock GT2052.

Like you, I tend to view the whole turbo issue "wholistically". I'm not too interested in maxing the boost potential of the B207L Saab engine as I know quite a few mods are needed, from AFR management to better intercooling, brakes, gearbox torque, and suspension bits, once you creep past 200 HP or 0.8 bars boost but still insist on utter, absolute, factory-level engine life and reliability under hard daily useage in places where one single minor breakdown can ruin your whole week (or two).

regards,
Cris

JD said...

Hello Cris, thank you. As far as I can tell there should only be a 3mm difference in compressor and turbine size between the two. The GT2252 turbo is what Saab would call a "high pressure" turbo that can be used up to 2 bar / 30 psi boost. And the GT2052 is more of a "low pressure" turbo that is made to be more efficient around 1 bar / 15 psi boost for the size.

I think the most obvious difference if I have the correct info with the stock Saab turbo is the turbine housing design used is different. And also there is a built in blow-off valve in the compressor cover.

So to make things work you would need to have an aftermarket recirculating blow-off valve fitted to the boost pipe instead to keep things reliable. And also probably have an adapter made for the manifold/turbine housing and another downpipe or flange for the exhaust.

That said the slight bigger turbine housing on the GT2252-S turbo could make it a bit slower to spool up but it should not be that noticeable over stock especially on a 2.0 liter 16V engine. And the GT2252 would also need to work less to make the same power so that would help with reliability.

CT said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
CT said...

Hi JD,

Thank you - I agree the larger turbine housing means a bit slower spool, and I accept that, especially if it means the turbine side working less hard and getting more reliability. I also agree there are quite a few packaging issues involved.

On the compressor side - I am trying to understand what the "-S" in GT2252-S means. My best guess is "-S" means smaller than the standard GT2252 compressor's 60 trim, maybe a 52 trim or even 48 trim. Do you have a better guess perhaps?

thanks again,
Cris

JD said...

Hello Cris, I really have no idea what the S stands for in this application. But even if the compressor would be different, the left side of the compressor maps would still look almost the same at low boost pressures. If you take a GT2052 compressor map and compare it to the GT2252 at 1.5 pressure ratio you would get about the same 50 lb/min air flow. And both turbos would start to max out around 200 and 240 lb/min at the same pressure ratio. Another compressor map to look at is the GT2259 turbo. There the air flow looks even more like the GT2052 at low pressures.

CT said...

Hi JD,

This is a very good insight I have missed - I see your point regarding map similarity more clearly now.

cheers!
Cris

mikeau said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
mikeau said...

Hi. Im looking to replace the turbo on my Defender 200Tdi engine. I dont want mega power but would probably run the boost about 1-1.5(max) with some extra fuelling. I would like a broader power range if possible. Someone suggested that the 2052v would be a strait swap and all I would need to do would be swap over the wastegate actuator. Is this a good upgrade?, will it swap strait onto the existing manifold(s)? and which vehicles should I look for as donor vehicles? Thanks

JD said...

Hello mikeau, if a broader power band is most important to you then perhaps an uprated VGT turbo would be the best option.

However at around £1000 it might not be what you are looking for.
https://www.allisport.com/shop/performance-products/vgthybrid-turbos/allisport-land-rover-defender-200-tdi-vnt-turbo-direct-replacement-turbocharger/

The GT2052v turbo should be a good replacement and cost a fraction to have it fitted. However I'm not sure the downpipe flange on the turbos are the same. So things like the exhaust might need to be modded. Not sure about donor vehicles. At least Volvo, BMW and Nissan use a 3 bolt flange on the turbine inlet so they won't be a strait swap. It looks like Audi use a similar 4 bolt flange on the turbine inlet, but use a 3 bolt flange for the downpipe so that might fit if you replace the downpipe. But there's always adapter flanges you can buy or if you are handy you can easily make that yourself if you find that the turbo you bought don't really fit as expected.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/GT2052-to-T25-T28-Turbo-Transition-Adapter-Flange-GT20-GT2052V-1-2-CNC-GT2860-/131837645291

As for the GT2052v turbo you might lose a bit of low end power but gain top end power instead. You would want to stay around 1.4 bar boost max as its most efficient in the 1 bar range.

mikeau said...

Thanks for the info. Appreciated.

mikeau said...

Thanks for the information. Im just wondering what the other numbers are when you are searching for GT2052V? My friend is also looking for one to replace the faulty turbo on his VW van and his is 454205. Am I right in assuming this is the configuration of the manifolds? If so, how do I find out what the correct number/configuration is for the Defender 200Tdi one? Thanks a lot.

JD said...

Hello mikeau,

You can look here for some of the manufacturer parts numbers for Land Rover turbos:
https://www.advancedfactors.co.uk/200tdi-turbocharger---defender-11144-c.asp

Garrett usually have specific numbers for the complete center section CHRA only that includes the compressor and turbine wheel. In the case of the Garrett GT2052 this number is 451298. For older turbos you could get the CHRA without compressor and turbine wheel however Garrett have lately been pushing to only sell the complete CHRA as ball bearing turbochargers are becoming more popular.

However that does not always mean the CHRA would fit and be a replacement to a VW or Defender turbo as there could be changes made to the wheel sizes by the manufacturer. So the only way to be sure if you don't have the right numbers is to do measurements to compare if you can't find the manufacturers specific number for the turbo you are after.

For reference the complete Garrett GT2052 turbo have the number 727264 and this is the one with the common 4 bolt flange etc.

mikeau said...

Thank you.

mikeau said...

Am i right in thinking that the 'V' part - the variable vanes - is part of the turbo exhaust assembly? I was thinking I could get a gt2025v cartridge and fit into my existing turbo castings, but would that defeat the object of the exercise (i.e. I wouldnt have the vanes, so no better low-end power?).

JD said...

Hello mikeau, you could get the GT2052v center cartridge but you would have to use a variable vane turbine housing also as the internal vane mechanics need some extra space. If you have measurements you could mix other VW, Nissan or BMW GT2052v parts etc.

As long as you make sure the compressor and turbine wheel sizes are the same. Or if you can find a GT2052v variable vane cartridge without turbine and compressor wheels then you could swap over the wheels or housing parts you need to that to make a complete turbo as long as you have a variable vane turbine housing.

I would not worry about stuff like balancing if you do it yourself because the individual parts are already balanced, and you would have to be very unlucky to have a turbo fail today from a balance issue. More common failures would be leaking seals, oil problems or nuts and bolts coming undone.

Unknown said...

I want to turbo my harley davidson. 1350cc 2006 twincam street glide. this looks like a good choice of turbo. I'd like to keep the engine stock right no . goal is about 120hp

JD said...

Hello, for the stock HD Evo 1350cc engine with the stock redline, I would recommend a bit smaller turbo like the Garrett GT1548 or GT1544 turbos. These have a smaller 41-42mm turbine housings so the spool would be better for the street and cruising around with the stock engine. You should still get around 120hp with 1 bar / 15 psi boost.

If however you want some more top end power in the future and go with something like a 80hp stage 3 tune then the bigger 47mm turbine on the GT2052 would be a better choice. With the same 1 bar / 15 psi boost you could get around 160hp and even 180hp with 1.3 bar / 19 psi boost.

Artur said...

Hi
I have a gt20 (3 bolt) turbocharger from mb c220cdi (vaccum accuated) and it is worth to put it on vw 1.8t engine? It is better or whorse than k03s/k04 setup? I ask because i have this turbo laying around. (Sorry for my nad english. I want to as i can to write witchout translator)

JD said...

Hello Artur, if you are not looking to make any more power then you could use the c220 GT20 turbo if you like. However if you use a K03s turbo you might get a bit faster spool times and with a good tune around 230hp. And the K04 would have similar spool to the GT2052 turbo but a bit less power. You can expect to get around 210-220hp with a GT2052 setup.

The BorgWarner turbos are a bit more efficient at higher boost pressures around 1.6 bar / 23 psi boost so that could offset some of the power differences. As the GT2052 turbo at around 1.5 bar / 21 psi boost starts to struggle a bit at those pressures and can't provide airflow for much more than 200hp.

Artur said...

Thanks for reply😉. Now i know everything. Long story short. I bought 1.8t engine for swap witch wrong turbo and now i'm going for stock 180hp only.

Mitcedes said...

I have an om605 150bhp engine fitted in my truck. Its got the gt20 bolted to it as standard with a mechanical fuel pump. Apparently (with the bigger elements in the fuel pump) its coming up with 180bhp 300lbs torque... question is, whats the standard boost pressure for this, what can i turn it upto without it going pop and how much bhp would i be looking at?

I need low down torque so not really that bothered about getting a bigger turbo.

CT said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
CT said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
CT said...

Hi Mitcedes,

A small clarification - was it 300 lbs-foot torque you reached? This about 400 N-M (in metric), or 2.4x the torque of 170 n-m for the NA OM605

Strictly speaking, you need to reach 2.4x the density of atmospheric intake air to support the 400 n-m torque that your new elements are capable of. Depending on your turbo and intercooler efficiencies, you will need a compressor Pressure Ratio (PR) of anywhere from 2.5 to 3.0 to reach that intake density. That PR is equivalent to anywhere from 22psi to 30 psi of boost. Now the GT2052 compressor map only goes to 2.5 PR, so the 2052 already seems insufficient from the boost pressure perspective alone.

Horsepower wise, a very very rough air flow requirement for diesel engines is about 1.5 to 2 lb/min per 10 engine HP. So if your engine is 180HP, you will need about 27 lbs to 36 lbs per minute of air flow - and again that is probably beyond the GT2052 compressor map which only goes to max 22-23lbs per minute.

If you keep the GT2052, and have fuel elements that can do 300 lb-ft torque in your OM605, you will likely end up with smoke and very high EGT for your om605 even at low RPMs, unless your 605 injection pump is equipped with a throttling mechanism to stop full fuel deployment until sufficient boost pressure (36 psi or more) is reached.

All that said, I will defer to JD if he has other views. My experience is mostly limited to diesel OM617 turbocharging and various 2.0-2.5 liter petrol engine turbocharging/intercooling projects, for some of which i used JD's important advice. For all of these projects the boost pressure was 14 psi or less, and the GT2052 was just about large enough - so your higher torque, higher HP project is almost surely too much for a GT2052.

in fact the main limitation I encountered (and which you will surely encounter) was the turbine side, where I was forced to install a 1.5" external wastegate because there was no way the stock GT2052 turbine and stock 1" wastegate can flow out much more than 22 lbs per minute - which is a lowish flow number for diesel turbo projects. Once that exhaust out-flow limit is reached, then obviously you cannot flow-in more than 22 lbs/minute of fresh charge, no matter what boost pressure, unless the balance disappears into a black hole somewhere.

Thus its possible your intake flow rate, and therefore your max horsepower, is artificially limited by how much your turbine + wastegate can flow out. The GT2052, having a small turbine and stock wastegate, may impose such artificially lower limits on your big diesel OM605 engine.

JD said...

Hello Mitcedes, I think the stock boost pressure for the GT20 OM605 engine is around 1.3 bar / 19 psi boost. However I can't confirm this, and some models also run lower boost around 0.7 bar / 10 psi.

But if you are running the 1.3 bar / 19 psi boost from stock that would mean you are pushing around 1.8 bar / 26 psi boost now to get 180bhp. And this puts you way outside the compressor map for the GT20 turbo.

And like CT mentioned you are probably around 27 lb/min in airflow for 180bhp. Now it would have been better if you could have reached this 180hp at around 1 bar / 15 psi boost instead, as the turbo is more efficient at that boost level, then you could probably push it a bit further. But you would still be way outside the compressor map for the GT20 turbo. And also the higher rpm you need, if you start to go beyond 4000rpm then the turbine housing is going to start to show it's limitations. You can port the internal wastegate bigger by a few mm but depending on your rpms and exhaust pressure it might not be enough.

For high revving diesels if you want more power but still want good spool and low end torque you should really look into the holset HX35 turbos or similar size. A good combination is a 7.5mm pump or mechanical around 120cc for a solid 300hp. The turbo OM605 engine stock can take 350hp and still be on the safe side.

FS said...

Dear JD,
thank you for all the information and help! :) I would like a tip regarding choosing a turbocharger as I am undecided. I have a Volvo 480 with a B18FT engine (1.7l petrol; 120hp @ 0.45bar) and the original TBO262 is too small for the aimed 200 - 220hp. I have a TB2559 from the Saab 900 now, but am considering switching to a newer GT turbocharger. Because of the 22 lb / min required, I kept an eye on the GT2052 or GT2056 (both should spool up earlier as the TB2559). On the one hand, looking at the flowchart and rating of the GT2056 I am not sure if it's not too big? On the other hand, looking at the flowchart of the GT2052 52trim it's nearly maxed out. What's your advise? :) Am I right that's it's the better choice using the GT2056 (570€ in Germany) in favor of better effectiveness and reserve, instead of the GT2052 (760€)? Or is there another option?

Thanks!

JD said...

Hello, I have more experience with the Volvo B20 and B23 engines but I would still go with the GT2056 turbo in your case. You would have alot more headroom and could get over 250hp with 2 bar / 29 psi boost, if the B18FT engine can take it that is.

However if you are only looking for around 200hp then the GT2052 turbo would be a good option also. You should have a little bit better spool with that turbo and get around 200hp with 1.4 bar / 20 psi. But at that point you would have maxed out the turbo.

One option to the Garrett GT20 would be the BorgWarner S1BG T25 turbocharger. The 313296 option with 0.46 A/R turbine housing and 39mm compressor would be good for 220hp with 1.6 bar / 23 psi. However these are also usually more expensive to buy so only looking at price the GT2056 is really hard to beat.

Unknown said...

Hi, I have 2052s which I believe came off a Land Rover with a td5 engine. I'm looking to replace the cartridge due to oil leaking into my intake system.

I've seen 2052v cartridges for a good price. Do you know if it would fit into the 2052s housing?

Thanks

Unknown said...

Hi again, if not the 2052v, do you know if the 2052LS would fit into the 2052s housing?

Thanks,
Shaun

FS said...

Hi JD.
Thanks for your reply! I've bought a GT2056 now for the B18FT. :)

JD said...

Hello Shaun, the cartridges should fit the GT2052 turbo but things like the oil / water fittings can be different. Also the compressor wheel size can be different. But if that's the case and your old compressor / turbine wheel still can be used you can swap them over to the new cartidge.

However if you already have the turbo apart it's really not that hard to change the seals. A GT2052 repair kit does not cost much and you should have all the parts you need to fix your old turbo.

Pretty good turbo rebuild post on Driftworks.com : https://www.driftworks.com/forum/threads/how-to-rebuild-your-t28-turbo.60665/

(However that turbo did start smoking again after 1200km but this was probably not because of a bad rebuild but more likely due to oil starvation as stated in the post)

Unknown said...

Hi JD, thanks for getting back to me so soon. I used a rebuild kit before and it doesn't seem to have lasted too long as I have oil coming through into the intake, hence why I like the idea of a preassembled and balanced cartridge.

I have done some research and from what I can tell the oil inlet and drain should be the same.

I have seen cartridges for 2052s, 2052v and 2052ls. The s seems to be the most expensive and if that's what I need then so be it but if I can get use a v or ls then that would be great.

My concern with using the v is isn't that variable vane? Would that have any effect on the actual size? I'd expect the the v to be slightly bigger because of it and not fit but not sure?

JD said...

Hello Shaun, my mistake I was looking at the wrong pictures, you are right about the 2052v cartridge. It won't fit without also using the correct variable turbine housing.

But the 2052ls should be the same. However do consider there are many different versions made of this turbo, and most manufacturers have different compressor wheels sizes fitted. So there is still a chance you might need to swap some parts over.

If you have problems with oil getting into the inlet it could be as simple as blocked crankcase ventilation or worn piston rings. With high crankcase pressures or lack of ventilation the oil seals in the turbo will start to leak some oil. So make sure to check for that.

Jamie said...

We have GT2052 (773049) on a perkins T4.4 (110hp) diesel engine. Centre bearing has some small movement but the turbo is otherwise working fine. We saw the same turbo in a different machine (previously leaking) blow up violently so are seeking to avoid this. I find complete non genuine 2052S cartridges for little money but don't know what the difference is. Replacing the bearings and seals is cheaper still until you add the extra cost of having the assembly balanced . Any suggestions?

JD said...

Hello Jamie, you can go ahead and get the non genuine 2052S cartridges if you like because the quality nowadays is pretty good.

If you want even more quality control you can look at https://www.melett.com/turbo/

But if you want to save some money and know the engine is not going to be in constant use with the turbo working hard all the time. Then you could get the repair kit and mark the compressor wheel and turbine shaft as good as you can so you put it back the same way, replace the bearings and skip the balance.

JakeSM said...

I read the above for GT2052 vs GT2252... Recapping you said for the SAAB guy, 15 psi for the GT2052 and 30 psi for the GT2252.
I'm working with a Nissan Diesel TD27 Turbo and looking to ditch the Hitachi HT12 For an OE GARRETT found on the newer TD27's but there were a few different turbos and a few different AR's.
I'm thinking the goal is 18-20 PSI not too much more due to simplicity and longevity reasons. (stock is 10 psi)
I'm leaning towards the GT2052 and I believe it is the more common unit with readily available CHRA's to get the most out of those OEM castings. They come in A/R .48 and .53 compressor side and I don't know how much I would be giving up down low by going .53 vs .48? in either case think I have heard it will run 20 PSI all day long on the 2.7 diesel...

On the other hand the GT2252 and TB2557 units are a little larger and less common. I've probably already answered my own question but are they even worth considering? I'm not building a race truck, I like quick spool/ get up & go over winding up the top end. Too big for my modest diesel needs?

Thanks for keeping this blog rolling!

JD said...

Hello, for a bigger 2.7l Diesel engine the spool won't be that noticeable even with the larger turbo. You would be running a bit cooler with the larger GT2252 compressor so there is less need for a good intercooler and would make a bit more power overall even on very hot days.

But as you said if you don't really care about top end power and you can find the GT2052 more easily then you should go with that.

That said if you are aiming to run 20 Psi boost all day long, then for longevity the GT2252 would be a better choice because with the GT2052 you would always be located at the very end of the compressor map.

JakeSM said...

Yes, in addition to foreign vehicles there are like 20 different Perkins engines that run the GT2052s. I seem to get a lot of results with that number. If I get a used casting and clean it up CHRA's should never be a problem.

Lower heat on the GT2252 sounds good and so does headroom in case I change my mind. But I've yet to find an original Garrett casting for cheap (maybe I'm being to picky) and besides the cheap EBAY CHRA's I'm not getting many reasonable results.

I'm new to turbo diesel and I still have some bugs to work out but I know the HT12 has the potential to become a future problem (or at the very least a limiting factor) so I'm trying to plan ahead. TC stall is about 1600 RPM and the HT12 is putting out about 5 psi by 1500 with a stock peak of 10 psi by 1750. So it's a good match for being pretty much all in at the start of an acceleration. I've got it up to 12 psi now, I didn't catch how long it takes to make that extra 2 psi but I like that it comes in quick! It should be really fun once everything else is sorted and can turn it up little by little.
Thanks!

JakeSM said...

Ok, I learned that the GT2252 with A/R .51 compressor is OE for the Nissan BD30.
It appears to have all the same turbine inlet outlet flanges as the td27's GT2052. (which come in .48 and .53)
Besides clocking and a custom actuator bracket for the GT2252 both look equally easy to replace my HT12.

And your saying that the GT2252 is the better idea for lower heat and better longevity. (I'm starting to lean this way) Any guess on when and how much boost would come in? How might it compare to my HT12's behavior as I described above? (I like that the HT12 comes in as quick and early as it does)

Thanks again!

JD said...

Hello, well it's hard to give an exact estimate on how fast the GT2252 turbo would spool on your engine due to many things that come into play. But considering the main differences is the turbine with the HT12 turbo having a 44mm or 45mm turbine wheel, and the GT2252 have a larger 50mm turbine I would expect the spool to be 250-500rpm later at most.

However I doubt it would be as much as 500rpm because the compressor wheel sizes are basically the same, so that would put you around 5 psi at 1750rpm.

But I know from experience that older Diesel KKK turbos can feel like they are slow to spool when driving, compared to a similar sized Garrett turbo on the same size engine it feels like Garrett have much faster spool.

JakeSM said...

Update, I stood on the brake pedal today and got 12 PSI at TC Stall speed of about 1600. It won't do that under normal driving because there isn't enough load, but it does get to 12 psi about 1750 and almost 13 psi when loading it above 2k.
Thanks for all the info, I'll give the GT2252 a shot and if its to late in the spool I'll step down to the GT2052.

JakeSM said...

Another observation, the GT2052 and my HT12 run oil and water but I think the GT2252 is oil only. I don't think it's a big deal, but what do I know about turbos? Would it be beneficial to add a water circuit? Might it be as simple and building a hybrid unit by swapping the wheels and seal plates over to a water cooled housing?
On the extreme side, I could also fab a water jacket to weld onto the bearing housing.

JD said...

Hello, well as long as you take care and let the turbo cool down before you shut the engine off, idle for 1-2 min or drive easy the last mile or so then the turbo should be fine without water. If you are in a hurry or you know others will drive the car then you could install a turbo timer.

Now there are cars like Audi, BMW that have started using coolant pumps that run around 5 min after the engine is shut off to further prevent oil boil-off. However this is more because there is so little room in the engine bay and the turbos are also heat wrapped to make them more efficient but also to limit radiant heat. So in these cases having water cooling is a must.

If you really want a water cooled turbo you could see if you can find a housing and swap the wheels over etc. I would not try and weld on the cast iron bearing housing unless you have some really good cast iron welding rod.

Rory said...

Hi,
Found ur thread through a Google search about Mercedes’ sprinter turbos. I have a motorhome on a 410d Mercedes om602 base. I have turbo charged the NA 2.9 Diesel engine and looking for possible turbo upgrades to help control EGT levels. I am running a modified pump with 6mm elements and have a large front mounted intercooler. The exhaust is 2.5” stainless throughout and has a high flow muffler. It runs a maximum of 12psi boost. Everything runs great and there is no smoke on or off boost.
I would just like to regain the lost power I have from turning the pump down to control the EGT’s.
The turbo i have is a Garrett - the only numbers I could see (turbo is still fitted to vehicle so can’t see much):
DHSGN A/R0.38 - stamped on exhaust side
51 - on cold side.

I currently have the pump fuelling turned down to the minimum to keep the EGTs to under 650c. As the turbo was not fitted as standard it is hard for me to find out which one I have. Visually, my turbo is very similar to the KKK turbo fitted to pre2000 300td, and similar, Mercedes. It has a 3 bolt triangular manifold attachment and short straight exhaust port with v-band clamp attachment.
Like this one:
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Turbocharger-Mercedes-E300-G300-S300-TD-1996-2000-130kw-6060960099-A6060960099-/363370882541?mkcid=16&mkevt=1&_trksid=p2349624.m2548.l6249&mkrid=710-127635-2958-0

Would a higher flowing turbo allow me to run more fuelling? Would the above KKK turbo be suitable and if not, what would you recommend? Can my current turbo be made to be higher flowing?
Thanks

JD said...

Hello Rory, hard to tell by the numbers what turbo you have. Could be a hybrid Garrett GT17 or GT20 the 0.38 A/R is very small though.

One way to bring down EGT would be to use a turbo with a bigger exhaust housing, or you can try and port the housing you have now for more flow. But you won't be able to do too much. The KKK turbo fitted to the 3 liter Mercedes engines have bigger housings and can flow more. I would personally go with a size bigger than a KKK K14 turbo for a 2.5 liter engine because even though it comes stock on those engine sizes and the EGT should be good. You still have a small exhaust housing that limits top end power a bit with that size engine. The KKK K24 that comes stock on 3 liter OM603 engines and would be a good compromise.

Rory said...

Thanks JD. Appreciate ur feedback. I have purchased a KKK turbo from a 300td and see how it goes.

Unknown said...

Hi JD I take it this is your blog. I like your dedication to this blog and your diligent answers to all the enquiries. I'm going to brush up on my turbo deciphering skills and familiarise myself with the different attributes of trims and the frame sizing and maps etc. I hope to in the future family commitments permitting turbo my 03 1.3 non vvti Suzuki ignis to about 185bhp with nice early boost onset. So I'll study the gt2052 and the gt2554 and see which will give me that figure and with the broadest power band or maybe how much boost onset would be sacrificed if the gt2554 could give 60 more bhp etc.

Good helpful blog this is. Appreciated.

JD said...

Hello, thank you for the kind words. If it's the 90hp Suzuki 1.3 engine you could even go with a smaller GT1548 turbo if you like for better spool. However the downside then to reach 185bhp would mean you need to run more boost around 1.4 - 1.5 bar / 21 psi. With the GT2052 you would only need around 1.3 bar / 19 psi and it's also possible that the power won't drop off at high rpms with the larger turbine.

JakeSM said...

Just a Follow up (OP October 17, 2021 at 6:43 AM) I tried the GT2252s and found it to be too big for my TD27. Too big of a jump on the turbine side and now Spool is really late and max boost is 15 psi if I let it rev out past 3000 RPM. I have to drive it like a gas car instead of a diesel. I'm pretty bummed. Next try will be a VNT GT2052V. I found at least two trucks using that turbo on the td27 and both are getting full boost before 2000 RPM. (one's running 16 psi and the other is running 20 psi)
I hope this info helps the next guy.

JD said...

Hello, you would need to increase the fuel if it's that slow to spool. If you have the electric VE pump this can be more difficult and easiest done with a new chip. However if it's the older mechanical injector pump then you could increase the fuel a bit and see if it helps.

Here's a guide for the TD42 pump: https://www.tillix.com.au/mechanical-diesel-engine-tuning/

JakeSM said...

It's got fuel! Smoke and EGT are a good indicator of that.

JD said...

Hello, thing is if I understand correctly that it can't make more than 15 psi and it's a good turbo then it could be fuel/timing related or you could even have a wastegate issue or leak somewhere. The GT2052V turbo have the 47mm turbine vs the 50mm on the GT2252 turbo so with VNT it should help with spool. But it would be good to rule out any boost issues first.

JakeSM said...

Turbos brand new, spins really and wastegate area seals well. Westgate actuator pulled tight and even vacuum line pinched off. Timing has been played with to get boost in a little sooner but I'm still not happy with it. Since pump and injectors are modified mechanical timing compared actual injection time will be different than stock. I have a timing light adapter that clips onto the fuel line on the way to help me double check that.

JD said...

Hello, one other thing to check is a clogged muffler / catalytic converter. Sometimes when running high egt on any type of engine one can get the pre catalytic converter closest to the turbo to collapse from the heat even when it's brand new. It's easy to overlook and it can be hard to tell what's going on when the engine can't make much boost even though everything else seems to be working fine.

JakeSM said...

Muffer was removed and bypassed as part to troubleshooting. Still too slow.
Not cats or other exhaust restrictions. Air Filter was cleaned, engine runs same with and without air filter, no other intake restrictions. I guess I was just too cocky picking a turbo spec'd for an engine 0.3L larger than mine.
I took apart the stock HT12-1 yesterday to measure it. Turbines size actually not as far different as I thought (51/42 HT12-1 vs 50/43 GT2252) but the HT12-1 has 10 blades (GT2252 has 9) and exhaust housing on the HT12-1 is smaller. I think the housing size and blade count is where all my spool went.

JD said...

Hello, it looks like you covered everything troubleshooting. It is a bit unusual though because looking at the size difference a 2.7 and 3.0 liter engine is only around 10% bigger. But then again if we compare the GT2052 and GT2252 turbine flow numbers there is a 34% difference in turbine flow. So picking a VNT GT2052V should help even more in your case. It would be interesting to know how the TD27 engine runs with the smaller turbo if the spool issues continue or not.

JakeSM said...

The GT2052v is on its way by comparison the GT2052s is stock equipment for the later model td27's. Same wheel sizes several sizes for COMP AR and of course Turbine AR is variable on the GT2052v. The one I was able to get is not a straight bolt-on (Audi version bolts to td27 but Nissan version does not) but I will try to report back here once I have made all the adapters.
P.S. The "Notify Me" button is broken so I have to remember to check back here.

JakeSM said...

PS. comparing A/R Numbers...
GT2252s turbine A/R is 0.67, noticeably larger next to the HT12-1...
GT2052s turbine A/R is 0.50, spools a little faster than HT12-1 (my buddy did this swap and I should have)
HT12-1 turbine A/R is about 0.53, the housing was not stamped so I did the best I could with math and manual measurement.

Emyr t said...

Hi, iv recently purchased a volvo v40 d4 which contains one of volvos last 5 cylinder engines but the 2.0 diesel rather than the famous 2.4 d5. I had hi expectations from the 5 cylinder but am very disappointed. So, looking to swap out the turbo for the 2.4 version gt2052v, i understand there may be some modifications to exhaust flanges etc, wondering what sort of gains should be expected as apposed to the standard turbo which i believe is a gtc1446vz from what i can make out? Iv already had the car mapped from 177hp to 200hp but hoping to squeeze some more out of it. Any help would be much appreciated please JD. Thanks.

Emyr t said...

Currently have a gtc1446vz on my 5 pot d4 (2.0 diesel) and looking for more get up and go, would the gt2052v off a d5 (2.4) be sufficient? Not to worried about modifications to enable fittment and obviously will upgrade intercooler the same time.

JD said...

Hello Emyr t, the stock GT2052v with the 36.80mm inducer wheel should give you around 20hp more, so 220hp would be possible. However there are also bigger 38.62 mm billet wheels for sale, so if you want a bit more power around 230hp you could make a hybrid turbo. But be aware that there are no compressor maps for the hybrid wheels so it's possible you could push that turbo further to 240hp if you really wanted to, but it would depend on your setup.

JakeSM said...

I'm back with a GT2052v installed on my Nissan TD27T. I ended up using the bolt-on Audi turbine housing and CHRA for easier exhaust and oil plumbing but I did need to swap and customize a compressor cover to fit my intake plumbing. This thing is great! Plus I can have 16 psi before 2,000 rpm and I'm currently peaking at 19psi somewhere above 2500 RPM. No electronic VNT controller and no Dawes valve, just boost straight into an actuator like you would a waste gate.
I am toying around with the idea of a GT2056v compressor side (probably after I get intercooling set up) but I will always know this GT2052v will be a good fall back!

JD said...

Hello JakeSM, that's great to hear the GT2052v is working so much better on the TD27 engine. I would not bother adding a VNT controller if it works so well without one. A rule of thumb to avoid compressor surge is to try and keep the compressor wheel size around the same size as the turbine, so a GT2056v compressor would work with a GT2052v turbine. And if you somehow run into some compressor surge you would still have the option to simply adjust when the variable vanes.

Post a Comment

Folks don't forget about racing safety gear when buying auto racing parts

I have been tuning engines for a long time and with that experience I tend to look a bit more at how other people tune their cars and bikes than anyone else. Now this is not true for everyone, but most of you will recognize yourself at some level.

About 25 years ago the level of tuning an ordinary street car would ever see was at most 30% increase in power. (Not true for every car out there, but I'm talking ordinary street cars here)

So if you had an Ford, Volvo or BMW the amount of power you could get would have been in the 150hp range and in some extreme cases 250hp. At this point this was the "limit" of ordinary naturally aspirated engines at that time. Yes there was a lot of racing going on at that time, and some of these race engines did get put into street cars and power levels would have been 300+ hp. But the amount of maintenance these race engines required and the cost to keep them running were too much for most people.

Back then you could not just go into a racing store and buy yourself a set of forged pistons and connecting rods. Let alone camshafts and valves to build your race engine.

With the introduction of turbochargers however the power suddenly increased to levels that are still uncommon in today’s cars. At the beginning people where not really sure how to tune turbo engines and intercoolers where something that most people had never heard of. Silicone hoses where did you get that?

You would have to know someone in the maintenence department that did service on trucks or busses that had turbocharged Diesel engines at the time to buy the simple things like, clamps, hoses, gaskets, oil lines etc. Even something like an external Wastegate that are availiable almost everywhere now today you could not get your hands on. And something like real drag tires where not that common either.

But as time passed by, engine tuners got their hands on more parts, most that had the machines and tools started to make their own intercoolers, wastegates and all the parts that were hard to get and the knowledge and the tuning business took of.

Now it still took some time before engine management systems and electric fuel injection where you could really start to extract power out of engines became common and figure out how to tune the software to make that work. To start if you found someone who could tune these you would have to fork out serious doe to get everything working. Well you still might have to do that today, and serious race teams do spend alot of money to get the electrical side working right. Today there are so many more things you can do with a powerful ECU, like traction control, different boost pressures for low and high gears, launch control, shiftcut etc.. This list is very long.

But before all that came chip tuning and fuel injected turbo engines. What was unheard of just 20 years ago would now become a reality for anyone with a few minutes of tuning. Some of you might know the story of the Ford RS Cosworth, Nissan Skyline, Audi S1 Quattro, Lancia S4 to name a few and other icons of the late 1980 and early 1990. The turbo engines back then would give you 200hp and that is still today 25 years on about the same power level you would get from a new car. However today this is a common power figure for a station wagon. And back in the 80s only a few racing breed turbo engines would give you that.

But with a few changes to the ECU with chip tuning and some larger fuel injectors all that was needed then was to turn up the boost pressure and 350hp where unleashed. The only real limit here was only how much air the standard turbocharger could supply.

Sure there where different levels of basic tuning you could do but the effect was the same, more power.

With more and more tuner friendly cars coming out over the years the power figures are still holding almost the same. Just until recently where the powerfigures have really started to go up and beyond what was thought possible only a few years ago..

But what have really changed today is the huge amount of DIY tuners out there. What engine tuners did 25 years ago have now entered the garage and racing parts have now become widely available to anyone. From the cheap Chinese made turbo exhaust manifolds to wastegates and almost every tuning part you can think of to the pure racing parts like forged pistons and engine management systems on sale that anyone can buy.

So what has happened is anyone with a little background in mechanics can now build their own race engine. Power levels have just gone up and up and up.. It’s not uncommon to see street cars today with 500hp and then there are the ones who have gone even higher, breaking the 1000hp barrier.

The one thing that all these engines have in common to achieve such power levels are of course the turbocharger. Without the turbo it would not have been possible. Well a supercharger or N02 injection could do the job too but that’s another story.

However time and time again people forget the most important parts when tuning cars. I’m talking about safety and racing safety gear. I do see that people buy racing seats and that’s good. But most of the time they don’t buy racing seats because of the added safety. It’s because they think racing seats look good. And what about things like auto racing helmets that keeps your head intact. Most of the time people come to the track without real racing helmets and if it’s street racing that’s taking place, no one seems to bother wearing any kind of racing helmets at all.

I do understand that people feel protected inside their cars and they don’t think they need roll cages and in some cases opt for roll bars instead but you really need to think about this.

Some of the racing safety gear you should look at are the following:
racing suit
racing shoes
racing helmets
racing gloves

This would be the minimum for my liking if your going on a trackday or similar race day event with your tuned car.

In case you don’t have a fuel cell in your car and there is a chance of fire or fuel leak then you should consider racing fire suits also because these will save your life.

Fire is not to be taken lightly. If you have a good fuel system in place to feed your engine and anyone who are looking for power is going to have that. Then you need to understand that at any given time those racing fuel pumps are pumping 2 gallons of fuel every minute. And if you get a leak and have an accident you are in real trouble if the power to the pumps are not cut right away.

So having the right racing safety gear to protect you is always a good choice. Today’s car are much safer than the ones years ago, but you need to understand that when we double and triple the amount of power and turn our 100mph car into a 200mph fire spitting monster of a car you really, really should spend some time and pick out some racing safety gear also.